Posts Tagged ‘organizing’

How To Organize A Protest

Photo by Friends of The Earth International

Editor’s Note: This is a guest post submitted to us by Alyssa Vincent. As Occupy Together is rebuilding to help people plug into the movement and give them the tools and resources they need to become engaged, we thought this would be a great guest feature to highlight.

The Occupy Wall Street movement is back in force now that warmer weather is here. The movement’s critics say Occupy demonstrations are still unorganized, begging the question, “How do you arrange a protest?”

I asked Mike Mann, founder and author of Crime.org, how he coordinates protests for his organization. He had this valuable advice:

Step 1: Set a Goal and Identify Your Audience
It’s important to identify what you want to accomplish with your protest. Are you trying to raise awareness? Are you trying to change a policy or law?  Once you identify the goal, you then must identify your audience. If you’re trying to raise awareness, then the general public may be your target audience. However, if you’re trying to change a policy or law, your target audience will be much different.

Step 2:  Determine the Forum and Tone of your Protest
It’s important to determine a medium for your protest, and how the demonstration will proceed. Maybe the Internet would be the best forum for your demonstration. It worked well for those protesting the SOPA legislation. Perhaps your protest is better suited in a park or on a street corner. It depends on your goal.
Also determine the tone of your protest. Are you going to have a silent sit-in, or will your protest be loud and in your face? The tone will vary depending on what you are protesting and your goal.

Step 3: Set the Location, Date and Time of the Protest
Sometimes the location for your protest will be obvious, other times it won’t. If you are protesting a law, a government building where the law is being drafted would be an ideal location. But if you are protesting a business with many locations, pick the busiest spot. Check with city officials if you are expecting a large crowd.

The date and time will largely depend on your goal. If you are trying to raise awareness among the general public, then the weekend when people are out and about would be the best time. If you are targeting business executives, weekdays would perhaps be most beneficial.

Step 4: Prepare Content for the Protest
Once you have the location, date and time nailed down, it’s time to start creating content for the demonstration. Make picket signs and pamphlets to let people know what you are protesting. If your protest is online, create images and videos with embed codes so they can be easily shared. Finally, refer people to a website before, during and after the event, and put the Web address on all protest materials.

Step 5: Promote the Protest
Depending on your budget, there are many ways to promote a demonstration. From billboards to passing out fliers, there is something for everyone. Some low-cost things you can do to promote your protest include writing a press release, contacting the local media, utilizing social media and asking like-minded groups to use their resources to help spread the word.

Step 6: Stay Positive
Don’t get discouraged if you’re the only one who shows up — ride out the protest solo. You may have hecklers, but it’s important not to get caught up in arguing, hate or negativity. Other people observe your behavior, and you want to be respectful to everyone. The biggest mistake you could make is getting discouraged and feeling like what you’re doing isn’t making a difference. Stick with it. You might not change anyone’s mind during the protest, but understand you’re planting a seed that could grow.

Whether you’re planning a small local protest, or something more large scale, these basic steps will get you started. Don’t let a lack of knowledge stand in the way of voicing your opinion, it’s your First Amendment right to protest, don’t be afraid to exercise it.

May Have Missed It: RadiOWS

With all of the talent and ideas surrounding #occupy, there are new projects and collaborations emerging daily. These pop up so quickly it’s hard to keep up. In an effort to spread the word, make connections, and spark inspiration for others, Occupy Together will be highlighting a few of these projects in this new blog series. If you have a suggestion for a project we should feature, please email us at info@occupytogether.org

RadiOWS

RadiOWS is a multimedia, free form radio show produced by Occupiers and aired monthly on the Pacifica Network. This project is relatively new and ready to grow. RadiOWS aims to air weekly as they expand. We’ve seen several #occupy radio efforts pop up and grow over the last several months. If you’d think you might have some talents or resources to contribute to an #occupy radio project or you’d like to get some advice on getting your own sister project off the ground, let us know and we’ll try to get you connected!

Episode 1: Foreclosure & Banking Crisis

Episode 2: Workers of the World

Episode 3: Women’s Issues and Organizing at Occupy Wall Street

Website: www.radiOWS.net (under construction)
Twitter: @radiOWSLive
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/radiOWS